Stories » Gustavo Dudamel adds film scoring to his resume for The Liberator / San Jose Mercury News interview

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Gustavo Dudamel adds film scoring to his resume for The Liberator / San Jose Mercury News interview

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It's nearly noon on a Saturday. A blazing sun bears down on the Hollywood Bowl, whose 18,000 seats are unoccupied at the moment. But onstage Gustavo Dudamel, the Venezuelan-born conductor of the Los Angeles Philharmonic, is leading a vigorous rehearsal.

The musicians, shaded by the venue's shell, are all in casual dress. Dudamel is sporting a black polo shirt, jeans and what look like blue suede shoes. Otherwise he remains a study in sheer concentration, precisely cueing various groups of musicians throughout the rehearsal, and giving them feedback on the sound.
 
He will open his sixth season as the Philharmonic's musical director on Sept. 30, an event that makes it hard to believe this conductor is only 33.

A world-class artist who has become synonymous with classical music in Southern California and who tours the world, Dudamel displayed a new facet of his talent in a July 31 concert at the Hollywood Bowl, leading the orchestra in a suite from the film score he recently composed, his first.

While cooling off backstage after the rehearsal, Dudamel explains how this new shift in his career happened.

In light of his commitments with the Philharmonic and two other major orchestras, Dudamel says he intended to be just a musical adviser on The Liberator, a film directed by his friend Alberto Arvelo and starring his friend Édgar Ramírez. Both are fellow Venezuelans, and the movie was inspired by the life of Símon Bolívar, the military genius who helped free not only their country but Bolivia, Panama, Colombia, Ecuador and Peru from Spanish rule early in the 19th century. READ THE FULL San Jose Mercury News INTERVIEW.