Stories » Laila Biali is an an awesome pianist with a soaring vocal range / Musicalmemoirs

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Laila Biali is an an awesome pianist with a soaring vocal range / Musicalmemoirs

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March is Women's History Month, a time to reflect on the role of women both past and present. March is a time of year that calls for extra love and support of women in jazz who are making a difference. I want to introduce you to some of today's women in jazz who are changing the face of music in their own sweet ways. 

Laila Biali is an artist who blends jazz and pop/soul and folk music in a way that still crowns ‘jazz' king. Her voice crosses genres. She has a tenacious delivery and exhibits a soaring vocal range on the very first tune of her album. As an awesome pianist and a competent composer, her song "Revival" talks about global turmoil and elicits a call-to-arms, encouraging the world community to unify.

She sings: "women fighting for equality … six million more united into one … paint your signs, pick up your shoes; take a stand, there's no excuse …"

Her next song is titled, "The Monolith." Webster's dictionary describes monolith as a large, single upright block of stone or concrete, especially a pillar or monument; also it could be a large organization or pillar of the community. In this scenario, Laila Biali lyrically describes a woman trying to break through something as strong as stone in her life. Her vocal tone is haunting and the mallets of the drums adds to the drama. The original composition titled, "Glass House" was co-written with her husband and album co-producer, Ben Wittman. She layers voices in warm harmony during this arrangement. Here is a song addressing the epic challenge of suicide in our communities and the after-effects of their very personal family member's suicide. On "Wendy's Song," she plays a piano ballad that is dedicated to a close friend who she lost to cancer. The melody moves from alto to soprano like a sunrise. Laila Biali's voice is smooth and full of shine and luster. The soprano saxophone solo adds a smooth jazz flavor to what sounds more like a folk song at the beginning of this arrangement. Even though these events are heartbreaking, Laila Biali manages to find hope in the debris of tears and sadness. She finds reasons to lift herself, her loved ones and the world "Out of the Dust." This is an album of resilience and fortitude.

"These new songs took shape as I processed my own feelings of doubt and loss," Biali reveals. "I believe that nothing is wasted, that even life's greatest challenges can produce something meaningful, even if only to make us more aware of and empathetic to the struggles of those around us."

The song "Sugar" is a jazzy, bebop production with a repeatable ‘hook' that's catchy and melodic. This is a song with unexpected modulations and it's quite joyful. Additionally, Liala Biali adds the most wonderful rendition of "Take Me to the Alley" written by singer, songwriter, Gregory Porter. Liala's voice is tender, warm and emotional on this great composition that tributes the down-trodden being lifted up.

Liala Biali has already been honored as SOCAN Composer of the Year at the 2005 National jazz Awards. She's been consistently performing worldwide and in spite of her own personal challenges, she has used those obstacles to create music and inspire others. She's won a Juno Award in her native Canada. This is a Canadian award that mirrors our United States Grammy Award. She's worked with both award-winning trumpeter, Chris Botti and the awesome and talented singer/songwriter, Sting. This is a woman who is making history, one step at a time, and is proud to rise up, "Out of Dust."