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'A Day in the Life - Impressions of Pepper' has permeated the membrane of aural art / JazzdaGama

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Depending on how old you are, what part of the historic and cultural spectrum you have roots in and who you believe, The Beatles' Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, recorded between November 1966 and April 1967, and released on the 26th of May, 1967 would be deemed to be the most important and/or influential act of music – as Rolling Stone magazine often puts it – "of all time". And while there are many caveats – such as those relating to being "white" and "western" or "Eurocentric", there is no doubt that with their legendary producer and "Fifth Beatle", George Martin, in the 1960's, The Beatles addressed like no other musical act, a radical shift in the cultural mindset of the late twentieth century. As Thomas MacFarlane, who teaches courses in music theory and composition at New York University put it, "Through tools of ‘electric technology', this shift encompassed the decline of visual modes of perception and the emergence of a ‘way-of-knowing' based increasingly on sound."

But music – certainly music today, like most art – is more porous than it has ever been. Charles Mingus even wrote a piece of music about this for his Epitaph album (that was recorded after his death and called the work "Osmotin". And so in the spirit of both monumental cultural icons we approach A Day in the Life – Impressions of Pepper, a reimagining of that iconic Beatles album, Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band which, in the spirit of Mr Mingus' term, is music that has permeated the membrane of aural art emerging through a portal as if relocated into a new soundscape, one that falls into Mr MacFarlane's "way-of-knowing" conceptual thinking. Viewed this way, whether The Beatles would have approved or not; whether the refusniks would find something vile to say about it or not, the fact is this is a hugely enjoyable and , at times, even brilliant execution of a bold concept.

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