Stories » Lisa Batiashvili the gifted young violinist who took the classical music world by storm as a 16-year-old releases: Beethoven Violin Conc. & Tsintsadze 6 miniatures

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Lisa Batiashvili the gifted young violinist who took the classical music world by storm as a 16-year-old releases: Beethoven Violin Conc. & Tsintsadze 6 miniatures

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Lisa Batiashvili, the gifted young violinist who took the classical music world by storm as a 16-year-old prize-winner at the Sibelius Competition, has matured into a most beloved artist, with artistic daring to match her technical security. Her latest release on Sony Classical is a personal and artistic achievement, featuring Beethoven's Violin Concerto, a benchmark of the repertory, and six miniatures by her countryman Sulkhan Tsintsadze.   The recording is available on March 3, 2009.

Tsintsadze's six miniatures, originally written for string quartet, are arranged here for solo violin and chamber orchestra; Beethoven's Violin Concerto features the Kreisler cadenzas.

Not yet thirty years of age, the enchanting Georgian violinist has come into her own as a distinctive, powerful artist. Championing the folk-inspired music of her homeland, Batiashvili plays Tsintsadze's miniatures with incredible color and idiomatic flourish.  Adding an extra layer of personal meaning, the pieces are arranged by Batiashvili's father, himself a violinist who first taught his daughter to play. The result is an intimate, provocative recital that invites the listener into a sound world Batiashvili has specially created. She explains:

"I anticipate that some listeners might be surprised by the order of works on the CD.... I was strongly moved to put the Tsintsadze first, for a number of reasons. These pieces resonate so deeply within me and speak so strongly of my personal and musical history and culture.  At the same time I have the feeling that once the listener's senses have been immersed in Tsintsadze's sound world, he or she listens to the Beethoven with completely refreshed ears. Beethoven's music then transports us into quite another world, even more powerfully felt because of this special context."

For the Beethoven concerto, Batiashvili herself directs the Deutsche Kammerphilharmonie Bremen, in what has been described as "a fine directorial debut" (The Independent). In a 2007 concert of the Beethoven Violin Concerto with the New York Philharmonic, The New York Times described Batiashvili as "a splendid, deeply musical young player," adding that "[other] violinists would kill for that sound." It is a piece perfectly suited to Batiashvili's temperament - she excels in contrasts, with moments of big, luscious tone that are nonetheless in firm control.
Batiashvili has played with some of the most prestigious international orchestras, including the symphonies of Boston, Chicago and San Francisco; the Cleveland Orchestra; the London Philharmonic, Philharmonia and London Symphony Orchestra; and the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, Orchestre de Paris, Leipzig Gewandhaus, and Tonhalle Orchestra. As a champion of new music, she played (and later recorded) the world premiere of Magnus Lindberg's Violin Concerto for the Mostly Mozart Festival.

Batiashvili lives in Munich with her husband and daughter. She plays the 1709 Engleman Stradivarius, kindly loaned by the Nippon Music Foundation.