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30 years ago, Ennio Morricone proved he was untouchable / Consequence of Sound

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Ever wonder which movies inspire your favorite bands or how filmmakers work with artists to compile your favorite soundtracks? Sound to Screen is a regular feature that explores where film and music intersect. This time, we're staying home in Chicago - Capone's Chicago. On June 3rd, 1987, Brian De Palma's The Untouchables arrived in theaters fully stocked with outstanding characters. There was Kevin Costner as charming Prohibition agent Elliot Ness, Sean Connery as grumpy Irish mentor Jimmy Malone, Andy García as hotshot Italian rookie George Stone, Charles Martin Smith as brainy accountant Oscar Wallace, and naturally, Oscar-winning juggernaut Robert De Niro as historic Chicago mobster Al Capone. Even now that would be a murderers' row of talent, but 30 years ago, it was the type of cast that could shift millions of tickets - and it did.

But, out of all the film's characters, none are more important than Ennio Morricone. There's no denying how vital Morricone is to De Palma's gangster epic. From the thudding main titles to the sweeping end credits, his Grammy Award-winning score rarely leaves a frame of the picture, glossing over the historical Chicago scenery, beefing up the undulating tension, and making every onscreen relationship feel palpable.   READ THE FULL Consequence of Sound ARTICLE