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Jane Ira Bloom has an asteroid named after her

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Crossover Media's innovative soprano sax player Jane Ira Bloom even has an asteroid named after her. 6083 Janeirabloom is a main-belt asteroid discovered on September 25, 1984 by B. A. Skiff at the Anderson Mesa Station of Lowell Observatory. Named in her honor, the Minor planet citation?6083 was issued on Feb. 11 1998. As the first musician in the NASA Art Program, Bloom has composed in the stars many times including for her recording 'Most Distant Galaxy' and she wrote 'Einstein's Red/Blue Universe' as a commission from the American Composers' Orchestra.

6083 is in a 3.35-year elliptical orbit around the sun ranging in distance from 275.6 million km (at perihelion, closest point to the sun) to 394.8 million km (at aphelion, furthest point from the sun). The next perihelion passage will occur on 2015 Jan. 8.2 UT.
The orbit is inclined by 5.7 degrees to the ecliptic plane (the plane of the earth's orbit about the sun). You will need a telescope to see it. The diagram in the photo shows the orbit in relation to the major planets in the inner solar system.

This view of the inner solar system is seen from the north ecliptic pole. The sun is the yellow star at the center of the image. The blue orbits represent, in increasing distance from the center, the major planets Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars and Jupiter. The position of each major planet at the date indicated at the bottom of the plot is shown by the large circled cross. The orbit of the minor planet is shown in red, with the location of the minor planet (at the date indicated at the bottom of the plot) shown as a white circled cross. From this vantage point the planets revolve around the sun in a counter clockwise direction. The vernal equinox is off to the right. The portion of the minor planet's orbit that is below the plane of the earth's orbit is shaded grey. The perihelion point of the minor planet's orbit is at the end of the white straight line through the sun indicated by "P".

If you are wondering about how minor planets are named, the discoverer of a particular object has the privilege of suggesting a name to a committee that judges its suitability, so go out and discover one! Read more about how minor planets are named.