Stories » Jane Ira Bloom - Early Americans makes Gene Seymour's Top Ten Jazz Discs for 2016

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Jane Ira Bloom - Early Americans makes Gene Seymour's Top Ten Jazz Discs for 2016

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Jane Ira Bloom, Early Americans (Outline) Hard to believe that after sixteen albums through nearly four decades, Bloom has never before walked the high wire with nothing more than a bass (Mark Helias) and trap set (Bobby Previte). She comes through just as you'd expect: with bold, deep tones that swallow you whole and bright,supple phrases that recombine themselves into breathtaking shapes. From Helias and Previte, she gets the kind of backup an ace improviser deserves. They merge their rhythmic instincts with her soprano saxophone's probing, soaring voice to become one entity, totally in control of whatever they take on, regardless of tempo or mood. On the (literally) groovy "Singing the Triangle," they seem to take turns at the wheel with Previte's toms assuming melodic duties with his characteristic wit and bravado. When it's just Bloom and Helias, as on "Other Eyes," the colloquy is so detailed and urgent that you think you're eavesdropping on a secret plan for curing cancer, hunger and ignorance. And when it's just her, in full flight, she asserts her command of every aspect of her art whether assembling a necklace of diamond-hard chords and taking them apart ("Rhyme or Rhythm"), burrowing deep into the contours of a classic melody ("Somewhere') or blowing the blues with joyous abandon ("Big Bill"). It's now official and can be certified by any number of witnesses: There's no one like her. Anywhere. - Gene Seymour

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