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Exceptions define Jane Ira Bloom / NEWMUSICBOX

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Jane Ira Bloom: Valuing Choices Made in the Moment

While thinking beyond musical genres is a hallmark of a great many of today's musical creators, Jane Ira Bloom clearly maneuvers within a genre while at the same time subverting any attempt at making generalizations about her work. The primary mode of music-making she engages in is performing her own instrumental compositions on the soprano saxophone in the company of a small group of like-minded collaborative improvisers, and those compositions are clearly indebted to the jazz tradition. But there are important exceptions to just about every detail of that description that are key to defining who she is as a musician.

She primarily performs her own musical creations, but just about every album she has ever recorded, as well as most of her live performances, also include at least one example of her own extremely personal interpretations of an American standard or a classic jazz composition. But while the American songbook has been an unending fount of inspiration for her improvisations and has even informed the ways she has constructed melodies in her own compositions, she has never featured a singer in any of her projects thus far. And, with the exception of her most recent recording, Wild Lines, which includes recitations of poetry by Emily Dickinson, all her performances are un-texted instrumentals. She performs almost exclusively on the soprano saxophone (there's been a stray track here and there over the years of her on alto), but she began her musical studies on the piano, and the grand piano she keeps in her living room is the main instrument on which she composes. She has primarily performed with and composes for a small cadre of fellow travelers with whom she has worked for decades (e.g. Fred Hersch, Mark Dresser, Bobby Previte), but she has also written music for orchestra, wind band, dance and film, and has participated in improvisatory world music collaborations with Chinese pipa virtuoso Min Xiao-Fen and South Indian vocalist and vina player Geetha Ramanathan Bennett (who died just a day after we recorded our talk with Jane Ira Bloom). Bloom acknowledges and embraces the jazz tradition, but for more than 30 years her saxophone improvisations have incorporated an electronic music component which she triggers in real time through the use of foot pedals, and sometimes the other musicians in her combos operate electronic devices as well.

"I'm definitely a lateral thinker," Bloom acknowledged when we visited her to talk about her various musical experiences and how they have shaped her aesthetics as a composer and a performer. "There's no question in my mind that my strong background as a melodist, as someone who's loved and studied melody in many forms, takes me wherever I go. I'm a saxophonist who's very much interested in sound, and I've spent a long time working on a particular sound that I really invested a lot of thought in on the instrument I play-the soprano saxophone. And I'm interested in phrasing and breath. All those things travel with me wherever I go, and when I'm using the live electronics, that's where they're compelled from. It's me; it's not a black box. It's not an idea. I've learned an awful lot from the Afro-American music tradition and the American songbook, as well as exposing myself to world musics and all kinds of contemporary classical music. … I know what's authentic and real about who I am, and I take that with me wherever my imagination takes me."

In addition to the aforementioned 2017 Emily Dickinson-inspired album, Bloom's imagination has led her to create a series of responses to abstract expressionist paintings by Jackson Pollock ("the freedom he was in touch with … is something that, as jazz musicians, we can tap into so easily") as well as motion-inspired melodic improvisation ("I collaborated with choreographers who were much more cognizant of this quality … you could make sound change by moving"). Her use of real-time live electronic processing in her saxophone playing has been an ongoing component of her musical explorations. Her description of it makes it seem a lot simpler than it actually sounds:

Basically what I do with the electronics is I still play the saxophone, but I play through microphones that access electronic sounds that I blend and combine with my acoustic sound. And I trigger them using foot pedals, live and in the moment. Over the years, I've gotten skillful playing on one foot and tapping my toe on some pre-programmed settings that I've designed-on basically an old harmonizer and an old digital delay-and combining them in unusual ways. … I've spent some time trying to get the way I use them as an improviser as fluid as if it was a key on my saxophone. … It makes sense to me when the sounds appear and when they don't, when I choose to use them and when I choose not to use them. It's got to be fast. It's got to be intuitive, because I'm using them very much in the moment of improvising.

Perhaps the most unusual place Bloom's imagination has taken her was to work with the American space program, which happened, as she explained to us, as a result of an unsolicited letter to NASA that her friend, actor Brian Dennehy, suggested she should write.

"I thought he was nuts," she remembered. "But some time went by and I actually sat down and I wrote a letter in the dark-a letter in a bottle, right?-inquiring whether NASA had ever done any research on the future of the arts and space, in zero gravity environments. Something I was always fascinated with. Six months later, I get this envelope back, which has the NASA logo on the front of the envelope from a guy by the name of Robert Schulman, director of the NASA Art Program. … Bob and I corresponded for years. He was interested in jazz musicians-lucky me, you know. Eventually I posed the idea, how about NASA commissioning the first musician for the Art Program? And he loved the idea."

Dennehy's "nutty" suggestion ultimately culminated in a 1989 concert at the Kennedy Space Center featuring the Brevard Symphony Orchestra in a performance of Fire and Imagination, an original work by Bloom scored for soprano saxophone, electronics, orchestra and "a whole bunch of ringers, the jazz musicians that were in the piece." Although the work has yet to be performed in its original version since the premiere and has also never been commercially recorded (though some reworkings of that material surfaced on her landmark 1992 album Art and Aviation), Bloom's association with NASA has had some unusual ripple effects. In 1998, an asteroid discovered on September 25, 1984 by B. A. Skiff at the Anderson Mesa Station of Lowell Observatory was named after her-6083 Janeirabloom!

As for what her next project will be, she has no firm ideas and, as an adherent to valuing choices made in the moment, she seems to like it that way.

 

READ THE JANE IRA BLOOM: VALUING CHOICES MADE IN THE MOMENT WITH FRANK J. OTERI
SEPTEMBER 1, 2018

 

Video presentations and photography by Molly Sheridan
Transcription by Julia Lu