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'Both Directions at Once' isn't an album and it wasn't really lost / the weekly Standard

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Impulse Records calls Both Directions at Once a lost album, but it isn't an album and it wasn't really lost. Nor, despite Coltrane's interstellar motifs and spatial excursions, has it fallen from the heavens. It has emerged from the attic of Coltrane's first wife, Naima, as an "audition tape" whose master tape was either lost or destroyed. It was recorded all in one day at the studio of Rudy Van Gelder. In the fifties, Van Gelder had created the Blue Note sound by building a high-ceilinged extension to his house in Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey, nailing the drums to the floor and running a jazz group through spring-reverb amplifiers the size of refrigerators. Apart from recording Coltrane's only Blue Note album, Blue Train (1958), Van Gelder also recorded several Coltrane albums for Prestige Records, whose less-polished sessions were a notorious source of cash for drugs.

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