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Leon Fleisher gives The Washington Post a peek into his Peabody Conservatory studio

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You get to Leon Fleisher's studio on the top floor of the Peabody Institute in an elevator big enough to transport bulky musical instruments, and the doors open onto a south-facing window overlooking a skyscape of copper roofs toward Baltimore's Inner Harbor.

That view isn't visible from the legendary pianist and conductor's rectangular studio, with its three small windows ("You can't have everything," he jokes), but the elevation is symbolically important. Fleisher, who's been here so long that he considers himself one of the institute's "concrete pillars," says he has been "aspiring to the rooftop" ever since he joined the Peabody in 1959 and was assigned space on the second floor.

The man, his music and his approach to teaching, it turns out, are at once solidly grounded while apparently defying some of the basic laws of nature. READ THE FULL Washington Post ARTICLE.