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Max Richter to play longest continuous piece of music ever broadcast live on BBC / The Independant

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For most performers, nothing is more disrespectful than a snoozing audience member. But Max Richter takes a different view. "If the audience stays awake during my performance I will consider it the greatest insult," says Max Richter, the classical composer who hopes his latest work will send the nation to sleep.

BBC Radio 3 is to air the world live broadcast premiere of Sleep, an epic eight-hour "lullaby for a frenetic world," which Richter has designed to transport listeners gently into slumberland. The longest single continuous piece of music ever broadcast live on the BBC, the British composer will begin the performance of his trance-inducing experimental work, accompanied by a small ensemble, at midnight on 26 September.

The premiere will be staged at the Wellcome Collection in London in front of an invited audience of around 20 people. Instead of seats, the venue will provide beds and the lights dimmed to encourage an appropriately somnolent atmosphere in the Reading Room. One of the longest pieces of music ever recorded, the gently pulsing Sleep is released on 5 September as an extended stream and download through Deutsche Grammophon – listeners are advised to place their devices on sleep mode to avoid distractions.   READ THE FULL Independant ARTICLE

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