Home » Stories » Why the 'BlacKkKlansman' score could earn Terence Blanchard his first Oscar / Los Angeles Times

Top 10 for Jun

Why the 'BlacKkKlansman' score could earn Terence Blanchard his first Oscar / Los Angeles Times

Bookmark and Share

One of the most arresting sequences in Spike Lee's "BlacKkKlansman" - based on the true story of an African American cop who infiltrated the Ku Klux Klan in 1970s Colorado - comes right at the beginning of the movie. It involves Alec Baldwin, as a fictional white supremacist academic, filming a kind of segregationist infomercial. As he delivers his increasingly hateful diatribe, images from D.W. Griffith's notorious "The Birth of a Nation" are projected onto his face, eventually obscuring Baldwin almost entirely - a powerful visual metaphor for the way racism can span generations.

Yet part of why this juxtaposition plays is because the sequence employs a third element: the lush strings of Terence Blanchard's music, which lends the scene a strangely moving quality seemingly at odds with what we're seeing.

Blanchard, 56, is philosophical about the lack of recognition.

"You never miss something you never had," he said with a laugh over the phone this week from New York, where he had a gig as part of Winter Jazzfest with his group, E-Collective.     Photo: (Lawrence K. Ho / Los Angeles Times)

READ THE FULL Los Angeles Times ARTICLE