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Ori Barel: Bio

Ori Barel's music explores various fields including electronic music, chamber music, works for solo instruments and electronics and orchestral music. His chamber music has been performed by The Formalist Quartet, Kacey Link, Timur Bekbosunov, Kobayachi Trio, and The Ear Unit in venues such as MOSA series (New York), REDCAT Lounge (Los Angeles), Ballhaus (Berlin), Santandler Festival (Spain) and Beyond Baroque (Los Angeles). He has performed his electronic pieces at various venues and festivals including: ICMC, Redcat, Soundwalk Festival, Center For New Music (San Francisco), CEMEC Festival in Stanford University, Mills College, and UCSD among others. In addition he has created soundscapes and compositions for various installations by different artists in museums and galleries such as Tel Aviv Museum, Jerusalem Artists' House and Overtones Gallery (Los Angeles). He holds a B.A. in Music Composition at UCLA and a Masters degree from California Institute Of The Arts where he studied with Michael Jon Fink, Ulrich Krieger and Marc Sabat. He holds a Ph.D. in music composition from the University of California, Santa Barbara where he studied with Clarence Barlow and Curtis Roads.

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Centrifugal Force For Player Piano

Albany Records has released a new album from composer Ori Barel featuring music for Player Piano. Featuring Barel's 4 part composition Centrifugal Force, a work inspired by robotic art, Barel comments: "We live in a culture where things happen extremely fast and so much information is condensed. I wanted to create a piece that would explore that aspect of our culture using elements of traditional and free jazz as well as silent film music, culminating in a musical fusion of today's technological world with pieces of the past. Using the player piano, I explored rhythms and tempos that would have been impossible for a performer to play accurately. To create a twist on this aesthetic, some sections of the piece accentuate the machine element and others sound like a performer is playing. This interplay between extreme fast and slow speeds fascinates me: an automated world contrasting a fake manual world."

Crossover Media Projects with: Ori Barel