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Joep Beving is set for Seattle's Benaroya Hall, Q&A's with KING: Second Inversion

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Solipsism refers to the philosophical idea that only the individual's mind exists because nothing outside of it-others' minds or the world-can truly be known. In other words, solipsism holds that there is no universal reality.

Dutch pianist and composer Joep Beving disagrees-his debut album Solipsism is meant more as a challenge to that philosophy than a statement in support of it. The up-and-coming artist, who has gained international acclaim through Solipsism, two follow-up albums, and several singles, uses music to challenge the notion that no shared reality exists. By distilling music to its aesthetic essence, Beving strives to create a universal language, something that disproves solipsism and speaks to everyone.

This week, Seattleites have the chance to experience Beving's universal musical reality. Beving is performing pieces from his anti-solipsist solo piano albums in the Nordstrom Recital Hall in Benaroya Hall on Friday, Oct. 26 at 8pm.

But it's not just about allowing audiences to experience a universal reality; it's also about improving the way we experience the world outside of the concert hall. Beving believes in using his universal language as a way to provide comfort and solace in a chaotic world. Though generally soft and slow, there's a gentle, rhythmic flow to his music that makes it majestic in an understated way. The warmth of his harmonies portray an underlying sense of hope even while the pieces traverse haunting, melancholy paths.

Beving's music also stands out because of his gentle touch on the keys. After his grandmother's death in 2009, he inherited her German piano and discovered that it required a lighter touch, ultimately leading him to adopt a more tender, classical style of playing. By working with a smaller range of dynamics and articulations, Beving is able to make a dramatic impact with the slightest changes in touch.

Though Beving's music is dark and ruminative, its underlying tenderness leaves you with a sense of inner peace. You'll leave the concert hall with a newfound connection to those around you, too, knowing that you've felt the same things and experienced the same reality.    Photo by © Rahi Rezvani, courtesy of Deutsche Grammophon

READ THE Second Inversion Q&A