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'Poet of the soprano saxophone' honors one of America's iconic poets / MAKING A SCENE

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It seems only appropriate that the artist dubbed "the poet of the soprano saxophone" by acclaimed jazz critic Brian Priestly would honor one of America's iconic poets. Jane Ira Bloom reimagines the poetry of 19th-century visionary Emily Dickinson in two different settings. Her double CD showcases her jazz quartet's interpretation of Dickinson's poetry and includes a second version for jazz quartet and spoken word featuring readings by popular stage and film actor Deborah Rush. This is Bloom's seventeenth album and first venture into music and text.

If you love the pure sound of the soprano without the screeching and honking and free from electric accompaniment, this album is for you.  The clarity of Bloom's sound is soothing, comforting and majestic.  Her distinctive sound resonates with her long-time band mates Dawn Clement (piano), Mark Helias (bass), and Bobby Previte (drums), all playing in the acoustic mode.  The Emily Dickinson narrative joins the ensemble in several passages on the second disc. Bloom composed Wild Lines when she was awarded a 2015 CMA/ Doris Duke New Jazz Works commission.

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