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Track Listing:

1
Til the Seas Run Dry
2
Polly Put the Kettle On
3
But They Got it Fixed Tight On
4
Have I Stayed Away Too Long?
5
Georgia Drumbeat
6
I Can't Do it Anymore
7
Sonoran Church Two-Step
8
Too Long I've Been Gone
9
Marching Up to Prospect Hill
10
It's a Good Thing
11
Grotto Beat
12
Hot Chicken
13
San Francisco Baby
14
My Money Never Runs Out

Dom Flemons :

Prospect Hill


AMERICAN SONGSTER
DOM FLEMONS
HEADS OUT FROM GRAMMY-WINNING
CAROLINA CHOCOLATE DROPS
FOR DYNAMIC NEW SOLO ALBUM
'PROSPECT HILL,' OUT JULY 22
ON MUSIC MAKER RELIEF FOUNDATION

Dom Flemons - founding member of the Carolina Chocolate Drops and American Songster - will release his third solo album 'Prospect Hill' on July 22 on Music Maker Relief Foundation. 'Prospect Hill' finds Flemons digging deeply into ragtime, Piedmont blues, spirituals, southern folk music, string band music, jug band music, fife and drum music, and ballads idioms with showmanship and humor, reintrepreting the music to suite 21st century audiences.

Following a series of tour dates with a new generation of American roots musicians like Pokey LaFarge, Flemons will perform April 18 as part of the Brooklyn Folk Festival at the Bell House. He performed and spoke on WNYC Soundcheck in March to talk about his Oxford American essay on Gus Cannon:  http://soundcheck.wnyc.org/story/gus-cannon-dom-flemons

Of his set at Sydney Festival, The Daily Telegraph (Australia) said this year, "Dom Flemons knocks 'em dead… a showstopper." Flemons has mastered a variety of instruments such as banjo, guitar, harmonica, fife, bones, bass drum, snare drum and quills. After a stint in New York City, Flemons has returned to his musical home of North Carolina.

Solo and with the Carolina Chocolate Drops, Flemons has played live for over one million people within the past three years. As part of the Carolina Chocolate Drops, which he co-founded with Rhiannon Giddens and Justin Robinson in 2005, he has played at a variety of festivals Newport Folk Festival, Bonnaroo, and the Grand Ole Opry.

The New York Times called the Carolina Chocolate Drops "an end-to-end display of excellence," continuing, "They dip into styles of southern black music from the 1920s and '30s--string- band music, jug-band music, fife and drum, early jazz--and beam their curiosity outward. They make short work of their instructive mission and spend their energy on things that require it: flatfoot dancing, jug playing, shouting."

Rolling Stone observed, "The Carolina Chocolate Drops are...revisiting, with a joyful vengeance, black string-band and jug-band music of the Twenties and Thirties--the dirt-floor dance electricity of the Mississippi Sheiks and Cannon's Jug Stompers."

The Guardian said, "An appealing grab-bag of antique country, blues, jug band hits and gospel hollers, all given an agreeably downhome production. The Carolina Chocolate Drops are still the most electrifying acoustic act around."